Articles Tagged with insulation review

ThermoFoam

Description ThermoFoam is a commercial spinoff of the NASA Apollo Space Program. NASA used a reflective foil covering for both the spacecraft and space suits to reflect the intense heat of the sun away from the astronauts by day and to reflect internal heat back inside the capsule of...

Cellulose

Description 80-85% recycled newspaper with fire and pest retardants added. Pros Probably the greenest material because it is mostly recycled. It also takes very little energy to produce it. Inexpensive. Does not lose R-value as the temperature drops. Provides a decent air seal when dense packed. (Dense packing is...

Fiberglass

Description Spun glass fibers made just like cotton candy only at 2000 degrees. Pros Essentially non-combustible. Non-corrosive. Fairly inexpensive. Sold everywhere. 30-40% recycled, the rest is sand which is a rapidly renewable resource. Decent R-value/inch. Does not absorb moisture. Will not support mold/fungus. Cons Itchy. Can perform very poorly...

Rock Wool

Description Very similar to fiberglass, rock wool or mineral wool is made from slag, the remains of the steel making process. Pros Handles heat very well. Used as a fire-stop in commercial buildings. Good sound absorption, the best by a small margin. High recycled content. Cons Itchy. Somewhat hard...

Open Cell Foam

Description Typically water based and very light density, this foam has the consistency of angel food cake. It weighs about .5 pounds per cubic foot. Air bubbles inside foam burst open, hence it is called ‘open cell’. Some types of open and closed cell foam have a soy base,...

Closed Cell Foam

Description Typically oil-based, high density (1.25-2 pounds per cubic foot) hard foam. It is a fairly mature product that has been out for 30+ years. Made of 2 parts, it catalyzes when mixed and cures quickly. Air bubbles inside (cells) do not burst, hence the ‘closed cell’ designation. Pros...

Air Krete

Description Essentially very, very light density concrete that goes in your walls in foam form. Pros Non allergenic, extremely mild chemicals. Very good R-value/inch. Does not shrink. Does not break drywall. Cons About 3 times the price of cellulose or fiberglass. Does not prevent radiant heat transfer – the...

Radiant Barrier

Description Tin foil on steroids. Originally called Multi-Layer Insulation by NASA who invented it for the Apollo missions, it is typically 2 sheets of foil with a scrim in between. They reflect radiant energy. Sunlight is the best example of radiant energy, campfires are another example. Our bodies also...